Tag Archives: pansies

Easter Reminders of Eternal Life

Life blossoms in the spring.

Apple Blossoms
Apple Blossoms

You know the drill.  All the leaves fall off the apple tree in the Fall.  The tree looks dead all winter.  But then tiny specs of green appear again in the Spring.  Before long, the pretty, delicate, pink buds are revealed and then blossom.  It’s kind of a relief when I see the apple blossoms.  It’s a reassurance that the tree is not only alive but healthy and it will again fulfill the purpose God gave it.  The blossoms make me smile.

Pansies on Post
Pansies on Post

We all have a purpose whether we know what it is or not.  I believe it is through serving others (family, friends or strangers) that our purpose is revealed.  Small, kind, acts or words that make someone smile renews hope.  That, I believe, is the message of Easter.  Jesus Christ gives old things new life and purpose.

Happy Easter!

Spring on the Alsea River

I wonder if the rancher planted these for his wife to see from their window?  Who’s ever idea it was, I love the pansies on the post.

Yellow Pansies on Fencepost
Yellow Pansies on Fencepost

It is calving season on the ranch.  The little black calves are cute but we keep looking for pregnant elk.  When is elk calving season in Oregon?  No one in the herd looks pregnant but I tried to get a photo of the tagged elk so we could read the number.

Cow Elk - tag A3
Cow Elk - tag A3

She’s a pretty girl!

Elk - tagged A3
A3 Elk - smile for the camera!

It’s hard to smile with your mouth full.  I should know. :-}

Here’s the LD on Roosevelt Elk A3 from ODFW’s Doug Cottam, Fish and Wildlife Biologist:

A3 was an adult when captured: I have no idea how old she really is.  She was captured on January 24, 2007 near the Golf Course inside Lincoln City along with 3 other cows.  She was released that day as well on the east side of the Drift Creek wilderness which is north and west of you.  A total of 10 cows and calves were released in the wilderness area.  Over the years the elk moved all over: to the north east of Toledo; to the northwest near Beaver creek and some to the south including Eckman Lake.  Several of the elk have been harvested by hunters over the years and one was poached (she had a radio-collar so we confirmed her demise). 

These elk were part of a large herd (around 60) inside Lincoln City limits where hunting is not allowed.  Over 17 were killed by cars, including an by an ambulance on an emergency call, in a 2 year period before we captured and relocated a total of 27.  The elk remaining in the area movement patterns were so disrupted by the capture that, for the time being, car collisions virtually ended.  The elk were released in 4 different areas including Drift Creek.  I know that a few moved 13+ air miles some time after release: that is a long way to move for Roosevelt Elk.

Look how much light is still in the sky at 7:45pm on Tillicum Beach!

7:45pm - Tillicum Beach
7:45pm - Tillicum Beach