Tag Archives: bald eagle

Eagle Alert!

“Eagle!” my content advisor (as he likes to go by) calls out.  I look out the window in time to see the adult eagle swoop down to the river.  Fumbling with my camera, I watch it land briefly on the rocks, pick something out of the river and continue flying upriver.

Adult Eagle on Alsea River
Adult Eagle on Alsea River

Keeping my eye on him I get my lens cap off, turn on the camera and get out the door onto our deck overlooking the Alsea River near the Oregon Coast.  He landed!  The “eagle has landed”; to borrow a phrase from my childhood.

I hear another eagle chirp every minute or so; like a juvenile keeping in close contact with a parent who has food.  And, sure enough…here comes the kid with a hollow leg.

Juvenile Eagle Joins Parent
Juvenile Eagle Joins Parent

Then another adult flew in to greet the two!

2nd Adult Eagle Flies In
2nd Adult Eagle Flies In

It happened too quick to get a photo of all 3 eagles together.  The camera doesn’t always win when I have to make a split-second choice between watching wildlife and photographing it.  The two adults flew off together and the young one stayed on the rock.  I couldn’t tell if the parent finished eating or left something for Junior.

Juvenile Bald Eagle
Juvenile Bald Eagle

Bald Eagles get their adult plumage in about 5 years. This one looks like it is beginning to get its white head feathers.

4-5 year-old Bald Eagle
4-5 year-old Bald Eagle

Beginnings

The weekly photo challenge is: Beginnings

Bald Eagle - 1st year
Bald Eagle – juvenile

This bald eagle is at the beginning of his life; probably 2+ years old based on the amount of white on his head.  His parents have taught him how to hunt and now he (or she) is surviving on his own.

I imagine he still sees his parents as they remain in the same general area.  But they cannot continue to feed their young or they would put themselves in peril.  So, whether he was a quick-study or a slow learner, he’ll eat what he can find on his own.  He was eyeing a dead fish carcass in the Alsea River today.  But he didn’t see it until after the tide came in and it was under water.  If he doesn’t find something else to eat, he knows he can come back here at a lower tide.

A bald eagle’s head and tail feathers aren’t solid white until about the 4th year.  I wonder if that is so adult eagles cut them some slack until they are full adults?

Hhmm – so there IS a lesson here for us humans – both for parents and for children establishing their independence